Meissen: More than Porcelain

If you have ever actually heard of the Saxon city of Meissen, it has probably been in the context of porcelain. Very nice, very expensive porcelain at that. Maybe you’ve even been to the Zwinger in Dresden and recall that the bells hanging high on the inner courtyard are made of fine Meissen porcelain.

Either way, Meissen is a lovely city located north of Dresden, though unfortunately far off the average American’s tourist route. (Sadly that also goes for most of the eastern part of Germany, except for Berlin.) Romy Foelck’s story “Old Guilt” is set in this very charming Elbe River city, the beauty of which provides a stark contrast to this story about the memory of violence against women in the waning days of World War II.  Please take a look at these photos, realize that you absolutely want to visit this wine-growing region (the Saxon whites are especially good!), and then read “Old Guilt” as a sobering reminder that over the course of history far too many men have used brute strength and violence to rob women of their self-worth, their free will, and their own bodies. We MUST not forget or fail to admit that this is still a problem in our world today.

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Meissen_evening

Meissen_-_Blick_durch_die_Burgstra_e_auf_den_Marktplatz,_im_Hintergrund_die_Frauenkirche (1)

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Photos:
By Olaf1541 (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Rnt20 (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Eberhard Franke (Landratsamt Meißen) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Adam Kumiszcza (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 


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